Skip to main content

About your Search

KRON (MyNetworkTV) 3
( more )
English 105
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 105 (some duplicates have been removed)
by the government on purpose. and today, in syria, where they are in year two of a very violent uprising, someone today in syria turned off the whole internet. the whole thing. for the whole country. all of a sudden. like a light switch. look at this graph. shows people using the internet in syria this morning. typing along. tweeting. whatever. and then, boom. lights out. no more internet in syria. somebody hit the off switch. here's another view. the internet in syria humming along, and then all of a sudden, nothing. syria has three cables that connect it to the rest of the world. as of about noon today, local time, this shows the traffic on those cables. all three cables just shut down instantly, off a cliff, nothing moving into syria, nothing flowing out. it's not like this has never happened before. syria has shut down the internet at times of military offensives in this uprising before. and we have seen other governments do this before. the government in egypt shut down the internet last year during the revolution there that toppled mubarak. same thing with government in libya. in the months
in egypt, in syria we don't have a process yet. >> rose: why not? >> because you know, the government is entrenched in a kind of denial position. saying that this is not the arab spring. this is-- . >> rose: terrorist. >> terrorist and conspiracy. >> rose: right. >> from outside. and of course the opposition think of themselves as a revolution. so they are not talking about the same problem. >> rose: and they've got the problem that syrians are killing syrians which always divides a huge mountain to provide. >> a lot of people are angry with me because i have called it civil war. but i'm afraid that is what it is. people were angry with me in baghdad when i said the same thing. so yes, it is, it is, it has a lot of what the revolution has but it has also an aspect of civil war. i think that is what is to be said to the security council sill that you have like in any conflict you have circles. the innercircle which is the locals, the region and the international. >> rose: right. >> security council is, has had a lot of difficulty coming together. yet it is probably the easiest ring to
>> according to a group of open government advocates, the obama administration's efforts and government transparency are mixed. the sunlight foundation held a forum on whether president obama lifted to his pledge to have the most open government in american history. this discussion is 90 minutes. >> good morning. welcome to the kayseri committee and transparency event on transparency in the obama presidency. i am daniel schuman with the sunlight foundation. welcome. there are many meanings of transparency. i'm not going to get into all of them today, but i'm sure there will be many different aspects. their widely divergent opinions on the successes of the obama administration and i hope to explore some of those today. president obama made a number of promises when he was running for president. a number are still available on during the course of the administration, new issues came up. everything from campaign finance disclosure to dealing with the lawsuit and others on visitors logs. there's been a lot of changes during the course of the administration. what i
about taking more money away from individuals and giving it to the government is not good for the economy no matter what? >> exactly. particularly when the economy is weak. even keynesian economists will tell you that is not the right time to raise taxes. >> i don't think so. we have a lot of kensyians are saying there is no demand. government has to make up for the demand that doesn't exist from consumers. that means you have to give them money to go out there and spend, no? >> they would say you spend but noo say tax at the same time. they would say that will counteract whatever spending you do, the tax increases. i think what you need to do is actually cut spending. at a minimum keep taxes where they are. be better if you could even reduce them. if you need to raise more revenue do things likes privatizations much better way for the government to get revenue in this type of circumstance. melissa: scott, you make the point that of course the government is going to go out and you know, try to raise taxes on wealthy because they're kind of only ones out there paying taxes.
to change the law. it is a difficult political situation we have. only one government in our history since 1948 has fulfilled a legal term. it was the gold my air -- golda meierboal th government, thanks to the yom kippur wall. our decision in this election to move forward as one big party was the first up towards this political reform. it is impossible to only preach and teach to others. you must give yourself some example of what you're willing to do. it was a small party that started as a liberal party. step after step, they took the power. for real political forms, we need political blocs, and i hope to see it the next knesset this new reality, presidential elections, four or five big parties. >> first of all, thank you again for joining us. i do not think if you ran research in the streets of tel aviv or washington you would find a lot of people who know who rousseau and voltaire are. if we want to wait until the palestinians know who they are, it is going to be a while. so let's put that aside for a second. the $10,000bout gdp. i think it is a lofty idea and a very good idea. let's a
in the federal government is i think invest in research and getting a 500-mile battery for electric cars and getting solar energy that is 1 kilowatt installed and finding a way to capture carbon from coal plants that can be turned into fuel that is commercially sold. we should look at the model of unconventional gas in terms of how our system and federal research and our system of private properties have produced a situation where we have a massive advantage over europe and asia in terms of our natural gas. it creates a better economy and that reduces the debt. >> there is a headline predicting we will be producing more oil than saudi arabia beginning in 2020. this is something almost on imagined 10 years ago. -- unimagined 10 years ago. what is the role of the federal government? >> to do things that encouraged the results. to follow up on the fiscal cliff. you can solve this fiscal problem if you grow our role to position relative to everybody else's. a big problem is the percentage of government spending is more than its should be related to total gdp. if there is an easier for millet
of the burden of having to govern egypt. removing themselves from the political system is more in keeping with the history of the egypt armed forces since the 1967 defeat when they determined being a political army was not good for their organization and their ability to fight a war on the battlefield. >> when you look at the struggle, is it first of all essentially the islamist versus the secularist, and is it fair to say as everybody does the islamists have greater appeal, they're better organized, they're going to win this? >> i think it is, right now there are basically three groups here that are contending for the loyalties of the great undifferentiated mass of egyptian people. one group is the egyptians. the people you remember from tahrir square a couple years ago. the third group, the mubarak loyalists. during the revolution of 2011, it was the islamists and young revolution nar ees against the loyalists. now because they have been so heavy handed in the way they have governed the transitions it's now really the revolutionaries fighting them. it takes egypt significant step more t
government. of course, the legal profession is crucial to the rule of law anywhere. weifang is correct to use the platform he has to force thousands of chinese students and to try to inspire them. it is important that we remain mindful of the admonition that even though lawyers value liberty, which is about taking away liberty, they are content. lawyers and the legal profession are tied to the status quo. this captures the dilemma of the elite bar today in china. its capacity to advance liberalization is constrained by officials and the party. i cannot tell you how many dozens of chinese lawyers have, with great regret, told me this themselves. honesty compels me to say if i were in their position, i am not sure i would act differently. there is a reason we are honoring he weifang today. he has an unusual degree of courage. weifang is not alone. it is striking to me how much of the impetus for rule of law in china has come not so much from elite professionals, but from a chinese of far more humble and modest stations. if you look at rights of protective lawyers and rave at this -- activists a
. they said they would cut government spending. they said they would stop the construction of a multimillion-dollar dam, make expressways toll free. prime minister noda had to come out last month to apologize for all the broken promises. support for his party slumped under his watch. the dpj offered a confused response to the earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear crisis. noda oversaw the restart of nuclear reactors, and he embraced unpopular causes such as the hike in the consumption tax. opposition leaders have criticized the dpj for putting the alliance with the u.s. in danger by flip-flopping on relocating american bases. you know, opposition parties will be making these same arguments to voters. >> so how do you rate the opposition's chances of winning? >> mm-hmm. recent polls suggest that main opposition leader democrats could regain power. you know, leader shinzo abe has already served as a prime minister in 2006 and '07. he says he would not yield in territorial fight with china and would increase defense spending if necessary. at the same time, he said he would do more to mend economic ti
-missile system to turkey; the massive protest against the government in cairo; paul krugman on the stalemate over taxes and spending; the ongoing cholera epidemic in haiti; and american military leadership. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: iran claimed today it has captured a u.s. surveillance drone. the "scan-eagle" is used to collect photographic and video images. iranian state television broadcast video of two military commanders examining the aircraft. they said it was seized "in the past few days," but they did not specify where or how. in response, the u.s. navy said none of its unmanned aerial vehicles-- u.a.v.'s-- are missing. and in washington, white house spokesman jay carney raised doubts about tehran's statements. we have no evidence that the iranian claims you cite are true. i'd refer you to the pentagon's comments this morning for details about this particular type of u.a.v., but again we have no evidence that the iranian claims are true. >> sreenivasan: a year ago, iran did manage to down a c.i.a. drone that apparently crossed the borde
, for exactly the reasons you just mentioned, because the government, you know, from the top down refuses to acknowledge this as terrorism, refuses to acknowledge the radical islamist angle, that he was communicating with a spiritual leader of al-qaeda before this attack happened, and because they still want to call it a workplace violence incident, they're unwilling to take all the necessary steps they would need to acknowledge that this guy's a traitor, killed our fellow members, and we're going the use every step possible. instead he's just a regular defendant on a murder trial, no islamic angle, and they're limited. megyn: well, you could make the argument that this will preserve the credibility of the verdict if it comes down guilty at the end of all these proceedings, that we bent over backward to protect this guy's rights as we do in our criminal justice system. pete, great to have you here. thanks so much for your perspective. >>> up next, a bombshell in the legal battle between the lawmakers in one state and their teachers' union. >>> plus, the woman best known for running "vogue
. syrians have the right to choose their government, the president, and any individual to run the world. as these ideologies are conflicting right now, that is normal. we see that in egypt. each side tries to extend its power through institutions, through the constitution. i think this is a healthy discussion, especially after 40 years of dictatorship. the people are not used to sharing their opinions and hearing other opinions. they need some time to be able to reconcile all of the different ideologies. at the end, i believe in the syrian people that they will be able to end the assad regime. >> thank you. i would like to debate on the ideologies and the syrian opposition. i will let you go into this issue. can you talking about the role played by the syrian muslim brotherhood within the opposition. the majority of the seats still being that of the muslim brotherhood. the leaders are close -- what is the role played by them? >> i think the united states has to deal with the reality with the rise of muslim brotherhood and the whole region, not only in to nietzsche, egypt. the difference
the field. >> john, there's a terrific bias in favor of government and i give you this example. when the debate about, whether to eliminate the mortgage interest deduction was being bandied about this week in washington, "the washington post" had this line, that would cost the government, the elimination of the mortgage deduction, 100 billion dollars a year. so, it's all about the government, what it costs the government. what about what it costs the taxpayers, the people who make give to these bozos to waste. >> i thought we were the government. >> exactly. >> i'm trying to figure out where cal is coming from. >> yeah. but the president, you know, was out in philadelphia on friday, and he seems to be sort of, continuing the campaign almost as if he didn't win the election and the media are playing-- >> again, look, there's no question the media are trying to push the republicans toward a deal although there's a significant backlash against it. look, the president is campaigning, he's campaigning, just like he's kept going, but it worked for him and before november 6th why should he
's grave for the obvious fact that we believe that the assad government has weapononized chemical and biological agents and put them in a position where they can be used fairly rapidly. as you look back over the 20 months of this conflict, this follows a series of events, one leading to the other which people said could not happen. this began, remember, with peaceful demonstrations. and when assad was unable to control them or suppress, he began to fire on his own people and they began to defend themselves in a very unfair fight which everyone thought we should take sides on the side of freedom and give the freedom fighters the weapons with which they could fight. it happened much too late. and people said, at least he's not using his air force to attack his own people and then he began to attack his own people from the air. now more than 40,000 killed. so when we see the government of assad weaponize chemical and biological agents and put them in bombs, we know this is a leader with no limits and unfortunately he follows his father who proved capable of using weapons against his
. the government didn't think it could distinguish between mortgage interest and other kinds of interest. less interest is deductible now. some of the things are left over from the early days of the tax code. there is no magic about allowing people to deduct mortgage interest and not the interest they pay on their credit cards. some of these things are hard to explain. host: does it incentivize home buying? guest: it does provide some if incentive for buying a home and is a large tax break and gives them an enormous benefits. it mostly provides an incentive for buying a bigger house. it seems to incentivize mcmansions. there is a fair question of whether that is something we should be spending that much money on. host: let's go to ohio, robert is a democrat. caller: yes, my question is this. a question/comment. i have seen all these outbreaks been giving out. supposedly they were created for an incentive for them to hire more people. they were given as four years and years. a majority of these companies did very little in hiring. they say they still need to do this. why should we continue givi
hates the government? maybe singing a little different tune today. >> it's because government's now telling them stop dreaming, stop striving. we'll take care of you. >> she gets the comedians laughing... >> that's hilarious! >> ...and the thinkers thinking. >> okay, so there's wiggle-room in the ten commandments is what you're telling me. >> she's joy behar. ... and current will let me say anything. >> only on current tv. >> cenk: the middle east is on fire, of course, what else is new, right? first we start in egypt where the new president has time to give himself unchecked powers with no oversight over his additions. tens of thousands of protestors marching on the palace. they've breached blockades barbed wire and it is a mess over there. they say this is the last stand and the last warning. over in syria the government is apparently moving its chemical weapons. now, of course is a red line for nato and the u.s. and even russia is concerned about this, saying if you use chemical weapons, then the international community will have to respond. already 40,000 dead in syria. >> in ir
this to a c.e.o. in the crowd. so maybe david, you could take this. what role should the government play in the future of -- your business is transportation, too -- in the transportation business with this? look, we are mired in conversations about a fiscal cliff on the very right now. we're talking about long-term infrastructure build-out, a long-term energy plan. what role should c.e.o.'s have and the federal government have in making sure this gets done? >> this is the perfect opportunity for the federal government and for state governments to work together to achieve a common goal, right? there's plenty of times where, when we run a business, our interests might not coalesce with the interests of either of the parties. as fred said, this is the opportunity that we have never had in this country before, where you can have consumer, the business and the governments all working together to take advantage of this huge resource, if you want to call it saudi america. from a waste management perspective, for us it makes so much sense, because it makes business sense. we get about $1.65 equi
years, there is a new route port commissioned by the government can't make dealing with concerns about the press. it was sparked by public repulsion about a single act, a hacking of the mobile phone for murdered teenager. from that beginning, it is expanded to cover the culture, practices and ethics of the press and misconduct relations to public, police and politicians. this inquiry has been the most concentrated look at the press this country has ever seen. in nearly nine months, for hearings, 337 witnesses gave evidence in person and the statements of nearly 300 others were read into the record. i am grateful to all who have contributed. the report will not be published on the inquiry website, which also carries the statements, the exhibits in both transcripts and video coverage of the evidence. for over 40 years, as a barrister and a judge, i've watched the price of inaction day after day in the courts in which a product is. i know how vital the price is. all of it is guiding interest of the public as a critical witness to events, as the standard error for those who have no one els
>> "inside washington" is brought you in part by the american federation of government employees, proud to make america work. for more information about afge and membership, visit >> production assistance for "inside washington" was provided by allbritton communications and politico, reporting on the legislative, executive, and political arena. >> my hope is to get this done before christmas. >> no substantive progress has been made in talks between the white house and the house. >> this week on "inside washington," heading towards the fiscal cliff. who is going to blink first? >> nobody can win everything. the republicans will have to give on revenue, democrats will have to give on entitlement reform. >> susan rice still in the bull's-eye. >> the concerns i have are greater today than before. >> lunch at the white house whitemitt. who will dare to break the no tax hike pledge? >> republicans who voted against the no tax hike pledged damage the brand for everyone else. captioned by the national captioning institute >> thomas jefferson said the purpose
, down the road an islamist-led government could use the constitution to deny them the right. they don't want to vote on this draft constitution. that's why they're out here protesting at this hour. >> reza, as always, appreciate your reporting from sicairo. >>> strong warning for syria's president not to use chemical weapons against his own people. nato secretary-general said the use of such weapons would result in an immediate reaction, his words. he described the syrian stockpiles as a matter of great concern and president obama has been warning of consequences if al assad makes what mr. obama calls the tragic mistake of using chemical weapons. former british prime minister tony blair voiced his concerns earlier on cnn. >> i mean now the death toll probably would be around 40,000, since this began, since a large number of people. but if there was any sense at all that assad was going to use chemical weapons or did use chemical weapons against his own people i expect a tough response that would be military. >> and nato is taking no chances by trying to protect one of its members, all
revenue for the government. >> well, a lot of people worry about the many years that japan has been in a slow growth environment, but they've kept interest rates very low in japan, but the problem is, government is too big. that's why japan has not been able to start growing again. and this is the path that the u.s. is certainly on if we don't change that dynamic. >> paul: kim, is there any recognition about this in washington or is it all -- i mean, do you hear any of this discussion or do they really believe, certainly, the white house and the treasury, that tax rates like this don't matter, at that ultimately-- >> no, they do to a degree. if you talk to the officials iran up, come on, so we're going to raise the rates, what is fascinating to put it in the bigger context of the debate about tax revenue, the economists have the static view, you've got x-amounts of capital gains income and you get 20% more tax revenue. >> you don't, because people decide to shelter it. they do their transactions the year before, when the amount is less. and so, all of these numbers that the white ho
, of course, had seized a number of military bases, government military bases and looted the weapons, taken the weapons from those to help arm their arsenals. rather than stay and occupy those bases, however, they've withdrawn knowing the syrian air force could attack those sites. so in recent weeks, the momentum seems to have swung the rebels' way, but right now analysts are very cautious in trying to predict what a tipping point could be for the fall of the regime overall. >> rose: and what happens if it falls? >> absolutely. and what steps next would we take. would assad retreat to the hills in an enclave of some sort, taking some of his chemical weapons with him? would there be some kind of political deal, some brokered deal to get him out of the country? right now many of these are some of the options that the u.s. is exploring with allies and russia for instance, today. as we reported in the "new york times," the administration is communicating through russia to syria against not only using these chemical weapons but against these type of attacks. >> rose: how do you measure the relat
speech to turn up the heat on eurozone governments telling leaders into the to rely on the ecb to stabilize the currency bloc. germany's finance minister warns a greek default could spell the end of the euro as the country's lawmakers prepare to vote on new funds for athens. and japan posts surprisingly strong industrial output this october and the government announces a $10.8 billion stimulus package. tokyo stocks end the week at a seven month high. plus president obama will take his case for tax hikes on the wealthy to the american people today as the war of words between democrats and republicans over the fiscal cliff heats up. >>> the trading session sitting roughly flat on the stoxx 600. decliners and advancers about even this morning. markets are trying to digest these comments from draghi. first, let's take a look at the bourses. s it is the last trading day of the month. just one left to go in this extraordinary 2012. ibex 35 appropriately enough is ending in the red today. other indexes showing a little bit of a rise here. we've seen spanish and italian debt come in sh
government? why would he be doing this? >> well, i think the professor reason is probably do it in conjunction with the anniversary or, on the 17th which is, widely reported in the paper, in the newspapers, but, you know, our assessment is that their desire to continue down this road is motivated by their desire to ensure that their capability, they are now a self-proclaimed nuclear state, their ability to be able to demonstrate to the world that they have the capacity to be able to build missile and have in the technology to be able to use it in ways of their choosing down the road. and this as i said earlier would be very destabilizing i think to not only to the region, but to the international security environment. so who's helping them and my assessment of their ability to be able to launch this missile? i think that they have progressively gained better technology over time, and they have progressively gained that through a number of methods over a number of years and decades. to the degree that they will be more successful than they were last time, in such a short perio
not because of government. companies were carved by bacteria simply to protect their brand. competition, device the pipes are reputation, it protects us much better than government over well. that is our show. i am john stossel, thank you for watching. [app >> gregg: financial future of the country may hang in the balance as the nation gets closer to a fiscal cliff. democrats and republicans have one month to come up with a plan to stop the across the board tax hikes and the major federal spending cuts from taking effect. i'm gregg jarrett. >> heather: i'm heather childers. some of the early optimism for a deal seems to be fading. steve is live in washington with more. >> reporter: one month away from that so-called fiscal cliff. there appears to be very little movement toward any kind of deal. president obama is using the bully-pulpit to appeal to the american people to push for immediate action to push the tax cuts for everybody except for those earning more than $250,000 a year. in his saturday address, he stressed the urgency of the situation. >> if congress does nothin
the best politics is good governing and i think we need to see more focus on solving problems and getting things done in washington than playing politics. i think to recognize there's been real progress made, right the border is safer today, the immigration system is better, the two parties worked together to do that over the last few years. there are still some meaningful things that need to get done. the d.r.e.a.m. act, we have to fix the low-end and high-end visa system. the mexicans are going to do a whole boar border system. i think there will be a lot of room to work together next year to get something meaningful done. if the republicans are earnest and play it straight i think they'll get a lot of credit for working with the democrats to fix the broken immigration system and making it better. jon: getting something meaningful done, it seems like a longtime since that's happened in washington. we'll look forward to it. simon rosenberg. kate obenshane thank you much. jenna: the nato alliance warning the assad regime in syria against using chemical weapons against his own people. this
: egypt's rush to draft a new constitution has sparked backlash against the government. tahrir square is packed with tens of thousands of egyptians protesting against their president morsi and his assembly after they approved a draft of the new constitution. they did it but any christians, no liberals, no moderate muslims, because they left the body in protest. they claim that the assembly is bent on passing laws that restricts speech and women's rights and the draft come as week after president morsi gave himself unchecked control over the country. he made himself a dictator. he claims it is "temporary" in order to promote stability. steve harrigan is live in cairo. what is the draft constitution? >>reporter: well, opposition figures including the nobel peace prize laureate is calling the constitution a coup against democracy. they are sharply criticizing it as a rush drive, 16 hours of voting on a constitution, pushing it through only after all moderates, liberals and christians have left the room in protest. right now it stands to go to referendum in 15 days but the anger against i
to the government to feed the beast that keeps spending and spending our money. they're allowed to hang onto a small portion of their profits. >> yeah. that is actually not really accurate. there have been numbers of studies, most recently from the organisation for economic co-operation and development but also last year we saw a bill proposed in congress from senator sanders and representative ellison, all of which identify over $10 billion annually that are going to the fossil fuel industry in subsidies. i'm a father too. melissa: congress doesn't have any money. they don't have money to give. the money they have have is my money that they have taken from me. it is company's money they have paid in. it is tax revenue. >> it is our money. melissa: hanging on to earnings, these are deductions rather than sending in even more tax dollars they're paying less tax based on investments they're making. you're calling those things subsidies. that is not congress's money. that is exxon's money it is hanging on to. but they're not taking money back. they're hanging onto the money they have earned. do you und
showing shelling in aleppo uploaded earlier today. in the past, the syrian government cut off access in an operation. but this is unprecedented. the military jet and two helicopters were shot down by rebels. now, takeovers at military bases given them a new arsenal of heavy weaponry. in this attack, they used rockets and as cnn's arwa damon reports, the rebels claiming this as a major victory. >> reporter: children on the back of a tractor made off with a sizable tangled lump of metal. what was all too often the cause of nightmares now a trophy of war. proudly shown off by this man. we want to take these pieces to show them to the other villages, he says. let them see what happened to these planes. everyone we speak to here describes the fear they felt any time they heard a jet overhead. for them, this is the greatest victory. one man who we spoke to said he was picking olives, saw the plane being hit and the two pilots ejecting. he says at that point everyone fanned out looking for them. he and others are telling us that one pilot was found unconscious with a head injury. video post
the pressing question of how to respond to the potential use of chemical weapons by the assad government in syria, the government warned him of the consequence conditions consequences he could expect. >> i want to make it clear to assad and those under his command the world is watching, the use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. and if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons there will be consequences and you will be held accountable. >> rose: i am pleased to have bob gates back at this table. welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> rose: so what are you doing since you left government? >> well, i am working on a book, a mental with a of my time under presidents bush and obama as secretary of defense, and doing some speaking but staying as far from washington, d.c. as i can. >> rose: when you look at writing a book, i mean, how hard is that for you to take the time anand think of all of the events and make sure that you get it right as you recollect it? >> first i have given myself a little out at the beginning by saying this is a purely personal reminiscence
welker, thank you. >> thanks. good to see you, chris. >>> now from the third branch of government. we're covering the entire government today. we'll find out if the supreme court will weigh in on a pair of hi high-profile cases that would help define the rights and benefits of same-sex couples. pete williams is the justice correspondent. he joins me from outside the supreme court. good morning, pete. >> reporter: good morning, chris. we're wait to go hear whether the court will take either of these two cases. the defense of marriage act passed in 1996 by congress, signed into law by president clinton. and what it says is that for federal law purposes, marriage can exist only between a man and a woman. so that means this in the nine states where same sex marriage is legal, if a same sex couple gets married there, they're considered mayrried for state lw but not federal law and the practical consequence is they are denied about 1,000 federal benefits, tax benefits, survivors benefits, to be covered under health insurance. that sort of thing. it will have to decide whether that law is un
the syrian government uses often to describe the rebels fighting against the government which is killing its own people. activists say the government has killed more than 40,000 people, or at least 40,000 have died in the civil war which broke out well more than a year ago. we have team fox coverage. now to the state department with reaction from the united states and nato. first to the chief fox correspondent at the united nations this afternoon. it seems there is a battle for a capital city that could be shaping up and that is crucially important. >>jonathan: yes. there is no doubt we have entered a new and very significant stage in the battle for syria and that is in essence of battle for the capital of damascus which has been going on for five or six days. president bashar al-assad wants do and indeed has to hang on to the capital if he is to stay in power. there are many experts who believe either way, he has decided to fight to the death. either if he tries to flow he will be killed by his own supporters who will feel betrayed him him or ultimately he will be killed by the rebels. this
in damascus. government forces have blamed rebels for the attack. nato has approved a request by turkey for the deployment of patriot missiles to its border with syria. turkey sought the missiles to defend itself from cross border violence. speaking in belgium, anders fogh rasmussen says the patriot missiles would serve as a deterrent to syria. >> i do believe that a deployment of patriot missiles will serve as an effective deterrent, and that way the escalate this situation along the syrian-turkish border. the mere fact that the patriot missiles have been deployed make it necessary for any potential aggressor to think twice before they even consider attacking turkey. >> the palestinian authority is urging the united nations and other actors to hold israel accountable for its recent expansion in the west bank. israel has announced plans to build 3000 new settlement homes and expand the e1 settlement the which splits the west bank in two in response to last week's vote at the united nations. palestinian president mahmoud abbas says the security council should pressure israel to stop expa
get out of this. yes it is in federal court. the question becomes, does the federal government take priority, does the state take priority? back a long, long time ago, melissa when the atute was enacted for bankruptcy it has to be federal. state contract says you honor that obligation. i think states are sovereign. municipalities are sovereign. the fs will be reluctant to tell them what to do. ultimately obligation, nkruptcy or not, that has to be satisfied. melissa: aaron, that is what bankruptcy is all about. that's why you declare bankruptcy. that's why you go through all the penalties involve in it. it is not a happy thing. it wl be very rd for them to borrow money in the future. they're going you there the downside of bankruptcy. seems like they should get the upside as well. is, they don't have the money. raising more taxes? people are fleeing this city as it is. >> what happened to vallejo, the first california city to go bankrupt in 2008. they actuall did raise taxes. along with that, they told citizens they could decide where the taxes went. so you may see a similar situati
to the regime since 2009 when the iranian government was caught off guard and saw the large presence on the internet and getting information from outside of the country and sending information from inside out. it was the twitter rev -- revolution. they were using youtube and blog citizen journalist . this is the dialogue and communication that the government wants to control. so on - >> gretchen: so they are putting satellite blockers. >> it is working. every time there is an obstacle in place they are fining ways to work around it they are technological savvy. three-quarters of the country is under the age of 35. this is not someone they can suppress for too much time . the message to the west and united states in particular, is that this is the achilles heel of the government in iran. they want to protect their existence and they feel vulnerable . they will go to any ends to stop this flow of information. >> gretchen: what should westerners be aware of? is there anything can do? >> support the iranian people in terms of the programs. in the 2009 uprising, there were independent com
to the federal government without raising tax rates which we believe am harm our economy. >> one conservative in the senate is breaking ranks with his party over the whole idea of raising tax rates with the party. tom coburn told msnbc today he would be okay with doing what the president wants, raising taxes on the wealthy, as long as it is coupled with entitlement reform and spending cuts. the reason we're told is because he believes at this point it's better to do that to get what he and other republicans want long term, which is a fundamental overhaul of the tax code, perhaps they can get that if they give the president what he wants now. you remember, coburn was among the first republicans a couple years ago to say it was okay to raise revenue. now he appears to be the first senate republican to say he would be okay with raising rates as long as it's part of that package we described. >> a meeting or a phone call between john boehner and president obama, is that at all in the works? >> as far as we know, no. whether it's in the works, we could only hope, at this point we do not have any i
republicans hate government and that's why they don't run it very well. >> but they hate government so that's why they don't run it very well. >> right. >> bill press said you can't be in washington without giving you opinion about whether or not we're going off the fiscal cliff, blah, blah blah. and i said the democrats tend to be the responsible party in terms of wanting to govern and then bill says because they hate it, and i say right. why would you make some big operate well that you don't like. >> you are a couple of marksists. >> what did reagan say? the government is the problem. >> right. they don't like the government. >> and i don't suppose the government is anything anybody would ever want to strangle in the bathtub. >> stephanie: no. all right. let's dive in to right-wing world. [♪ circus music ♪] >> stephanie: all right. rush limbaugh. >> folks i'm a little worn-out fed up and very inpatient with these ongoing assaults on the people who work in this country. the current disaster is not teaching people a lesson, nothing will. we're not teaching people to be
's iconic tahrir square. speaking out against the new proposed constitution. the government infamous majority rushed to approve it before a court could stop them as christian and secular members boycotted a vote walked right out of the hall. activists say the measure could limit civil lishedz in a big way. among other things increases the influence of sharia law and commits the state to protecting morlgs and the quote traditional family. the document does strengthen bans on torture and arbitrary arrests. also curbs executive power and pliments presidential terms. this comes just after the president there mohammed morsi granted himself sweeping new powers basically made himself a dictator. that's what first triggered the protests and less than two years after the fall of egypt's aauthoritarian leader hosni mom bark many egyptians fear their new leader and islamist allies are putting the country back on the path toward dictatorship. steve harrigan live in cairo. steve, any sign the president is willing to concede on any of this? shepard, president morsey has made no moves on compromise
is going to be done down the road by the government. i don't know anyone who would ever believe such a promise. i don't expect that the republicans would accept that offer from the president. i just don't see that as ever happening in the city. let me ask you -- >> i'm sorry. republicans basically have to say our principles here are correct. our whole analysis of the economy is correct. we need massive spending decreases, and they've got to stick with that. if they can get decent spending increases and have to agree to additional revenue, fine. if they get pushed in the position the president is trying to push them, they stick with their principles, you know, and a year and a half from now go to the electorate with that. it worked in 10. it will probably work in 14. it will be a shame because it will do a lot of damage to our economy in between, but the president has that really on his shoulders. he's the leader. >> greta: mayor, thank you, sir. >> thank you. >> greta: breaking news out of syria. the syrian government mixing components for the deadly sarin nerve gas. the ranking
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 105 (some duplicates have been removed)